⚓️ Published #onthisday 165 years ago, Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick,” initially a

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⚓️ Published #onthisday 165 years ago, Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick,” initially a

⚓️  Published #onthisday 165 years ago, Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick,” initially a

⚓️ Published #onthisday 165 years ago, Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick,” initially a commercial failure during the author’s lifetime, later became the “Great American Novel.” Along with literary admirers such as D.H. Lawrence and William Faulkner, visual artists have also long been interested in and inspired by Ishmael’s tale of sea captain Ahab’s quest for the great white whale. One of artist Alexander Calder’s largest mobiles, “Ahab,” is composed of three arcs made of steel rods and irregularly shaped disks that suggest natural forms. From childhood Calder enjoyed inventing mechanical toys and gadgets. In Paris during the 1920s and 1930s he encountered a new type of sculpture, pioneered by Picasso and the Russian Constructivists: assemblages of wood, metal, plastic, and cardboard, with space incorporated as part of the design. Calder began building similar abstract pieces in 1930, but gave them a new dimension–motion. Fellow artist Marcel Duchamp christened the moving sculptures “mobiles.” Be sure to look up next time you’re in the lobby at Mia to catch this mobile at its best–in motion.
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Alexander Calder, (United States, 1898–1976), “Ahab, 1953, Painted metal. Gift of Bruce B. Dayton and Mr. and Mrs. Gerald A. Erickson, by exchange, 83.77, © 2015 Calder Foundation, New York / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
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#CallMeIshmael #MobyDick #Ahab #MobyDickDay #HermanMelville #Melville #AlexanderCalder #Calder #AmericanArt #VisualArt #Mobile #WhiteWhale #OnThisDay #otd #Sculpture #Art #ArtMuseum #ArtHistory #MinneapolisInstituteofArt #MiaisMine #artsmia

Shared by artsmia (Minneapolis Institute of Art) and selected for Art.

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