Wünsdorf-Waldstadt, former East Germany. A Winkelturm bomb shelter sits nested between housing

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Wünsdorf-Waldstadt, former East Germany. A Winkelturm bomb shelter sits nested between housing

Wünsdorf-Waldstadt, former East Germany. A Winkelturm bomb shelter sits nested between housing

Wünsdorf-Waldstadt, former East Germany. A #Winkelturm bomb shelter sits nested between housing blocks built by the Nazis and then, later, by the Soviet Red Army. This former #military city was founded by the Prussian army at the start of the German Empire. Later, it was used to house POWs during World War I before being substantially beefed up under Hitler. The Nazis built an elaborate series of bunkers disguised as quaint cottages nearby. Following the end of World War II, the Red Army took over its operation and further expanded it to become the largest Soviet military installation in the region. It’s genealogy is a mix of the machinations of ideologues, something which is visible in thick layers of distinctly #Soviet and #German architecture. #Khrushhyovka #apartment blocks butt up against the soaring, steeply peaked roofs of German origin among a considerable, city-sized sprawl of buildings. The Winkelturm, named for its inventor, Leo Winkel, dates to World War II and is a peculiar kind of above-ground bomb shelter. It’s sloping sides and pointed top made not only a difficult target for bombers but, in the event of a hit, it would simply deflect the ordinance off to one side or another like some kind of magic Christmas tree. There are several floors of shelter space extending from ground level upwards to its pinnacle. This Winkelturm sits among converted Red Army and Nazi living quarters which have been recently developed as residential properties. #WünsdorfWaldstadt extends for several miles in all directions with pockets of development surrounded by the slow decay of a city that was mostly abandoned when the Soviets left in 1994.
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